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Detergents Used for Cleaning of Pharmaceutical Equipments


Nonionic detergents are used for equipment cleaning to protect the product quality in pharmaceutical manufacturing.
There are different types of detergents such as anionic detergents, cationic detergents, amphoteric detergents, alkaline detergent etc. This nature of the detergent depends upon the nature of the surfactant found in the detergent. These all have their specific use due to their cleaning properties.

Non-ionic DetergentAll of the above detergents have free ions and these are left after cleaning on the cleaned surface. A mixture of nonionic and anionic detergent is found to be an anionic detergent. These free ions can have harmful effect in the pharmaceutical products and affect their stability. Therefore, nonionic detergents are used for cleaning of equipments in pharmaceutical manufacturing.  Nonionic detergents are also required to clean the glassware used in the pharmaceutical analysis because these free ions can alter the results of analysis.

These are prepared by the reaction of molecules containing hydroxyl group like alkylphenol and ethylene oxide. This reaction is a exothermic reaction which generates heat. Ethylene oxide is very toxic and explosive in nature. Therefore, these are synthesized carefully in special equipments.

Nonionic detergents do not ionize when these are dissolved in water. These are manufactured using the same quantity of acids and bases of same strength and don’t have the acidic or basic nature. Therefore pH value remains neutral. These detergents make less foam than cationic or anionic detergents when used with water. Due to this property these can be cleaned easily from the equipment surface. These are very much effective against the oily material. Generally these pharmaceutical detergents are found in liquid form.

Ankur Choudhary is India's first professional pharmaceutical blogger, author and founder of Pharmaceutical Guidelines, a widely-read pharmaceutical blog since 2008. Sign-up for the free email updates for your daily dose of pharmaceutical tips.
Email: .moc.enilediugamrahp@ofni Need Help: Ask Question


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